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lunedì 16 luglio 2018

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Good News, curiosità e paradossi su società, viaggi, arte e comunicazione

AUGURI: PERCHE' OGGI? AUGURI: PERCHE' OGGI?

AUGURI: PERCHE' OGGI?

Oggi, ora e per tutto il prossimo anno, i nostri migliori auguri

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Your favourite things: Hotels are finding out what amenities guests really want Your favourite things: Hotels are finding out what amenities guests really want

Your favourite things: Hotels are finding out what amenities guests really want

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Main image:  IT HAS been more than once that Gulliver has found himself putting the incorrect electrical plug into the wrong socket or dock at a hotel—whether it be for a smartphone, laptop or shaver. Since such gadgets have proliferated, the hotel industry too has been confused about what facilities they should offer to...

Your favourite things: Hotels are finding out what amenities guests really want

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Main image:  IT HAS been more than once that Gulliver has found himself putting the incorrect electrical plug into the wrong socket or dock at a hotel—whether it be for a smartphone, laptop or shaver. Since such gadgets have proliferated, the hotel industry too has been confused about what facilities they should offer to service weary travellers. But after much trial and error, hotels finally seem to be figuring out which amenities guests truly value—and which ones are little more than gimmicks.The latest survey of American hotels from the American Hotel and Lodging Association, an industry group, reveals a plethora of shifts in the hospitality industry, including the rapid disappearance of smoking rooms. But when it comes to gadgets, the trends are particularly interesting, since they are not always in the direction of more technology.The biggest shift, unsurprisingly, is the growth in the availability of internet access. In 2004, the earliest year for which the report has data, half of hotel rooms had high-speed access. Last year, that figure had climbed to 98%. The number with in-room wi-fi has also surged from 35% to 98% over the same period. Outside of budget hotels—91% of which have high-speed in-room internet—and hotels with fewer than 50 rooms—92% of which do—a fast connection to the web is ...

Stubbed out: Smoking rooms are disappearing from hotels

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Main image:  TO THE list of endangered travel facilities—which includes pay phones, communal aeroplane screens and concierges—there is one more to add: smoking rooms. Even a few years ago, guests were routinely asked whether they would prefer a smoking room or not. But today fewer hotels are offering smoking rooms and those that do have a vanishingly small supply.According to the latest report from the American Hotel and Lodging Association, a trade group, the share of hotel rooms that are non-smoking has steadily risen from 74% to 97% over the last decade. And the proportion of hotels that only offer non-smoking rooms has jumped from 38% in 2008 to 85% last year.For a business traveller with a tobacco habit, then, there are few options. Those seeking a dash of glamour will struggle, as 97% of luxury hotels do not have smoking rooms. Only among budget-hotel category—the lowest price segment of five listed in the survey—do the majority of establishments have any smoking rooms on offer. Small hotels are more likely to have smoking rooms than larger ones. And older hotels are a slightly better bet than new ones.Non-smokers may want to avoid these cheaper, older haunts. Even if they land a non-smoking room in a hotel with smoking options, they are still subject to second-hand smoke. A study in 2013 found ...

Stubbed out: Smoking rooms are disappearing from hotels

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Main image:  TO THE list of endangered travel facilities—which includes pay phones, communal aeroplane screens and concierges—there is one more to add: smoking rooms. Even a few years ago, guests were routinely asked whether they would prefer a smoking room or not. But today fewer hotels are offering smoking rooms and those that do have a vanishingly small supply.According to the latest report from the American Hotel and Lodging Association, a trade group, the share of hotel rooms that are non-smoking has steadily risen from 74% to 97% over the last decade. And the proportion of hotels that only offer non-smoking rooms has jumped from 38% in 2008 to 85% last year.For a business traveller with a tobacco habit, then, there are few options. Those seeking a dash of glamour will struggle, as 97% of luxury hotels do not have smoking rooms. Only among budget-hotel category—the lowest price segment of five listed in the survey—do the majority of establishments have any smoking rooms on offer. Small hotels are more likely to have smoking rooms than larger ones. And older hotels are a slightly better bet than new ones.Non-smokers may want to avoid these cheaper, older haunts. Even if they land a non-smoking room in a hotel with smoking options, they are still subject to second-hand smoke. A study in 2013 found ...

Help unwanted: Hotels are employing fewer concierges

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Main image:  IF BUSINESS travellers need to reserve a table at a restaurant, they may use OpenTable, a website. If they wish to find a nearby museum, a Google search will probably be their first port of call. And if they want transport into town, they can easily hail an Uber. Given that so many services are just one swipe away, is there a need for a hotel concierge anymore?Increasingly hoteliers think that there is not. The share of American hotels with concierges has fallen from 27% in 2010 to 20% last year, according to a report by the American Hotel and Lodging Association, a trade group. Since 2014 the number of luxury hotels that employ a concierge has declined by 20%.Though concierges are not extinct quite yet, those that remain tend to work in upmarket establishments. In America 82% of luxury hotels employ concierges, as do 76% of “upper upscale” hotels, the second most glamourous category. After that concierges are a much rarer sight. Just 16% of “upscale” hotels have them. For “midscale” chains, that figure is now only 3%.One reason that travellers tend to prefer technology is that it can harness the wisdom of crowds. Several hotel-goers told WHYY, a Philadelphia radio station, that it is pointless to rely on a single person’s advice when the recommendations of thousands of people ...

Help unwanted: Hotels are employing fewer concierges

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Main image:  IF BUSINESS travellers need to reserve a table at a restaurant, they may use OpenTable, a website. If they wish to find a nearby museum, a Google search will probably be their first port of call. And if they want transport into town, they can easily hail an Uber. Given that so many services are just one swipe away, is there a need for a hotel concierge anymore?Increasingly hoteliers think that there is not. The share of American hotels with concierges has fallen from 27% in 2010 to 20% last year, according to a report by the American Hotel and Lodging Association, a trade group. Since 2014 the number of luxury hotels that employ a concierge has declined by 20%.Though concierges are not extinct quite yet, those that remain tend to work in upmarket establishments. In America 82% of luxury hotels employ concierges, as do 76% of “upper upscale” hotels, the second most glamourous category. After that concierges are a much rarer sight. Just 16% of “upscale” hotels have them. For “midscale” chains, that figure is now only 3%.One reason that travellers tend to prefer technology is that it can harness the wisdom of crowds. Several hotel-goers told WHYY, a Philadelphia radio station, that it is pointless to rely on a single person’s advice when the recommendations of thousands of people ...

Thaad’s all, folks: A geopolitical row with China damages South Korean business further

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Print section Print Rubric:  A Chinese backlash over South Korea’s missile defences hits Lotte and other firms Print Headline:  Thaad’s all, folks Print Fly Title:  Lotte exits China UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The right way to help declining places Fly Title:  Thaad’s all, folks Location:  SEOUL Main image:  Closing time came suddenly Closing time came suddenly IN A cosmetics emporium in central Seoul, rows of snail-slime face-masks sit untouched. Not long ago, visiting Chinese tourists would snap these up as avidly as a designer handbag in New York or anything from London featuring the Queen. Yet now their rejuvenating properties are failing to lure the country’s shoppers. Seo Sung-hae, a salesman, says business has slowed to a snail’s pace, because of a drop in the number of ...
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