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sabato 23 settembre 2017

Magazine

Good News, curiosità e paradossi su società, viaggi, arte e comunicazione

PER LA PRIMA VOLTA IN SVEZIA IL BOCUSE D'OR EUROPE 2014 PER LA PRIMA VOLTA IN SVEZIA IL BOCUSE D'OR EUROPE 2014

PER LA PRIMA VOLTA IN SVEZIA IL BOCUSE D'OR EUROPE 2014

Stoccolma ospiterà i Campionati Europei di Cucina in concomitanza con GastroNord e VinNordic

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Stoccolma ospiterà i Campionati Europei di Cucina in concomitanza con GastroNord e VinNordic
SPAZIO ITALIA, CASE HISTORY DI SUCCESSO SPAZIO ITALIA, CASE HISTORY DI SUCCESSO

SPAZIO ITALIA, CASE HISTORY DI SUCCESSO

Spazio Italia è il magazine di Air Dolomiti, la più importante realtà di trasporto aereo regionale italiana, parte del gruppo Lufthansa.

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Spazio Italia è il magazine di Air Dolomiti, la più importante realtà di trasporto aereo regionale italiana, parte del gruppo Lufthansa.

Ryanair: Price or quality—pick one

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RYANAIR is the airline Europeans love to hate. Horror stories abound about flying with the carrier that took the no-frills model to a new extreme. Some find its hidden charges annoying: one British family in 2012 were charged €300 ($405) to print out boarding passes they left at home. Others are driven to distraction by petty irritations, such as noisy announcements flogging perfume and booze on night flights, when most people would prefer to be snoozing. Yet needling customers has not, so far, stopped Ryanair becoming one of the largest airlines in Europe. An estimated 81m passengers used it last year, more than flew with rivals like British Airways and easyJet.So why do people still fly with Ryanair, even as they moan about standards of customer service? When I got caught up in travel disruption at Dublin airport this week, the answer to this conundrum became clear. In spite of spending almost four hours sitting on a motionless Ryanair plane that was then cancelled, followed by another long wait in the terminal until we finally boarded a rescheduled flight, passengers were surprisingly forgiving. “It’s not like we’re doing anything else today”, commented a pair of retired teachers on holiday. For them, price was more important than service.Flights with the airline were so cheap, most passengers seemed to feel, that it did not matter if occasionally things ...

Sri Lankan tourism: Post Tiger economy

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IN FEBRUARY 2009, during the final throes of Sri Lanka’s 25-year-long civil war, Tamil Tiger rebels packed two light aircraft with explosives and flew them towards Colombo. The pilots planned to execute kamikaze attacks on the capital. Mercifully, they were shot down. But in the process one plane slammed into a high-rise government building, killing two people and injuring 50. Thus ended one of the most dramatic episodes of the war. Today, five years after the guns were silenced, Sri Lanka is staking its hopes for peace and prosperity on a more benign form of aviation: commercial flights delivering holidaymakers.Official statistics, which cannot always be taken at face-value, nonethless point to progress. Indeed, the speed at which tourists seem have flocked back may even seem tasteless. In July 2009, just two months after the war came to its grisly denouement, the Sri Lanka Tourism Development Authority (TDA) recorded a 28% increase in tourists stays compared with the same month a year earlier. At the time, some 280,000 Tamils were being held in internment camps pending security clearance, and the UN was castigating Sri Lanka’s government for the heavy-handedness of its final assault on rebel-held territory. An estimated 40,000 civilians died during the last four months of the war. Yet the allure of the island proved too strong for holidaymakers. When it became ...
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